Health Benefits Of Carrots

Carrots are often thought of as the ultimate health food. Generations of parents have told their children: "Eat your carrots, they are good for you," or "Carrots will help you see in the dark."

Cancer

A variety of dietary carotenoids have been shown to have anti-cancer effects, due to their antioxidant power in reducing free radicals in the body.

Studies have found a possible link between diets rich in carotenoids and a lower risk of prostate cancer, but more evidence is needed to confirm whether the link is causal.

Lung Cancer

Carrots contain beta-carotene. Past studies have concluded that beta-carotene supplementation may reduce the risk of lung cancer.

A meta-analysis published in 2008 found that people with a high intake of a variety of carotenoids had a 21 percent lower risk of lung cancer, after adjusting for smoking, compared with those who did not.

The same pattern was not true for any individual carotenoid, such as beta-carotenoid. Among smokers, beta-carotene supplementation may increase the risk of lung cancer.

Colorectal Cancer

Consuming more beta-carotene may reduce the risk of colon cancer, according to researchers who studied 893 people in Japan.

Leukemia

A 2011 study found that carrot juice extract could kill leukemia cells and inhibit their progression.

Vision

Can carrots help you see in the dark? In a way, yes.

Carrots contain vitamin A. A vitamin A deficiency can lead to xerophthalmia, a progressive eye disease that can damage normal vision and result in night blindness, or the inability to see in low light or darkness.

Cancer

A variety of dietary carotenoids have been shown to have anti-cancer effects, due to their antioxidant power in reducing free radicals in the body.

Studies have found a possible link between diets rich in carotenoids and a lower risk of prostate cancer, but more evidence is needed to confirm whether the link is causal.

Lung Cancer

Carrots contain beta-carotene. Past studies have concluded that beta-carotene supplementation may reduce the risk of lung cancer.

A meta-analysis published in 2008 found that people with a high intake of a variety of carotenoids had a 21 percent lower risk of lung cancer, after adjusting for smoking, compared with those who did not.

The same pattern was not true for any individual carotenoid, such as beta-carotenoid. Among smokers, beta-carotene supplementation may increase the risk of lung cancer.

Colorectal Cancer

Consuming more beta-carotene may reduce the risk of colon cancer, according to researchers who studied 893 people in Japan.

Leukemia

A 2011 study found that carrot juice extract could kill leukemia cells and inhibit their progression.

Vision

Can carrots help you see in the dark? In a way, yes.

Carrots contain vitamin A. A vitamin A deficiency can lead to xerophthalmia, a progressive eye disease that can damage normal vision and result in night blindness, or the inability to see in low light or darkness.

 

 

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